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Tenzir v4.10

· 5 min read
Dominik Lohmann

Today, we're releasing Tenzir v4.10, which improves how Tenzir integrates with modern deployment practices.

Pipelines as Code

In today's deployment landscape, best practices emphasize GitOps in synergy with Infrastructure as Code (IaC). With the goal of integrating our services into these existing mechanisms, we're excited to introduce Pipelines as Code (PaC) in Tenzir v4.10.

PaC differs from traditional deployment methods in two key aspects. Firstly, pipelines deployed as code always start with the Tenzir node, ensuring continuous operation. Secondly, to safeguard them, deletion via the user interface is disallowed for pipelines deployed as code.

Here's a simple example to get you started:

<prefix>/etc/tenzir/tenzir.yaml
pipelines:
suricata-over-tcp:
name: Import Suricata from TCP
definition: |
from tcp://0.0.0.0:34343 read suricata
| import
start:
failed: true # always restart on failure
Want to learn more?

Read our guide on PaC: 👉 Deploy Pipelines as Code

arm64 Docker Images

Did you ever try to run Tenzir in Docker on a new-ish MacBook and encountered this error?

❯ docker run tenzir/tenzir:v4.9.0 version
WARNING: The requested image's platform (linux/amd64) does not match the detected host platform (linux/arm64/v8) and no specific platform was requested
tenzir: error while loading shared libraries: libfluent-bit.so: cannot enable executable stack as shared object requires: Invalid argument

Now, this works as expected:

❯ docker run tenzir/tenzir:v4.10.0 version
{
"version": "4.10.0",
"build": "",
"major": 4,
"minor": 10,
"patch": 0
}

This works because the Tenzir Docker images now are multi-archecture images built natively for both linux/amd64 and linux/arm64/v8. In addition to supporting M-series MacBooks, this also allows the Docker images to run without emulation on other arm64-based systems like AWS Graviton.

Reimagining Unsafe Pipelines

We've substituted the tenzir.allow-unsafe-pipelines feature with tenzir.no-location-overrides, flipping the default set-up and enhancing user experience.

tenzir.allow-unsafe-pipelines had been historically puzzling for newcomers given its seemingly fearsome name and ambiguous implications. Why would someone consciously permit unsafe pipelines? And why have we now defaulted to allowing them?

Pipelines have the ability to execute in multiple processes. For instance, executing tenzir 'from file.json | import' would prompt from file.json to run in the tenzir process, and import in the connected tenzir-node process. An operator's location can be assigned as local, anywhere, or remote. On initializing a pipeline, Tenzir's executor intelligently divides the pipeline according to location change between local and remote, starts separated pipelines at their respective locations, connects them to one another.

However, operator locations can also be manually manipulated. For instance, when capturing PCAPs, users might desire to prevent unnecessary inter-process communication and directly connect the Tenzir Node to the network interface—achieved by executing tenzir 'remote from nic …'. This command instructs the executor to consistently run from nic … directly at the node. When introducing this feature during the Tenzir v4.0 release, we wanted to be cautious about unrestricted use of this feature, leading to the creation of the tenzir.allow-unsafe-pipelines option, which by default was set to false. This option prohibits the use of location overrides when enabled but simultaneously posed puzzlement to new users being the lone feature disallowed in an "unsafe" pipeline.

In response to feedback, we've improved our approach. Location overrides are now permitted by default and can be disallowed by using the new option tenzir.no-location-overrides.

Apply Contexts to Multiple Fields

Did you ever want to act on multiple fields in enrich or lookup? Now you can!

For example, you can now use a GeoIP context on all IP addresses in your data as simple as this:

Enrich with a geoip context named country

| enrich country --field :ip

You can also specify multiple fields explicitly:


| enrich country --field src_ip,dest_ip

The output of lookup and enrich changed slightly to accomodate multiple contexts in the same event. Under the output field (that defaults to the context name), there is now a new record named context, under which we replicate the path to the enriched fields for placing the context. That is, the context of id.orig_h in this example is accessible as country.context.id.orig_h:

export | enrich country
{
"ts": "2021-11-17T13:53:51.022351",
"uid": "CVtvt83MWz8MBNTWWd",
"id": {
"orig_h": "244.69.36.0",
"orig_p": 45228,
"resp_h": "242.239.167.49",
"resp_p": 34774
},
"proto": "udp",
// ...
"country": {
"timestamp": "2024-03-11T15:58:00.596027",
"mode": "enrich",
"context": {
"id": {
"orig_h": {
"country": {
"geoname_id": 1861060,
"iso_code": "JP",
"names": {
"de": "Japan",
"en": "Japan",
"es": "Japón",
"fr": "Japon",
"ja": "日本",
"pt-BR": "Japão",
"ru": "Япония",
"zh-CN": "日本"
}
}
},
"resp_h": {
"country": {
"geoname_id": 1861060,
"iso_code": "JP",
"names": {
"de": "Japan",
"en": "Japan",
"es": "Japón",
"fr": "Japon",
"ja": "日本",
"pt-BR": "Japão",
"ru": "Япония",
"zh-CN": "日本"
}
}
}
}
}
}
}

Other Changes

For the curious, the changelog includes the full list of bug fixes, changes and improvements introduced with this release.

Play with the new features at app.tenzir.com and join us on our Discord server.